Thursday, September 1, 2011

Oliver Ellsworth, and the Senate, View 1st Amendment's "Respecting" as Only "Establishing" of National Religion

From Oliver Ellsworth's writings condoning taxpayer support for Christianity, we have proof from Ellsworth's leadership in the Senate, and as prime mover in Washington's government, the 1st Amendment refers only to an establishment of a National Christian Church, given the Senate's understanding, otherwise Ellsworth and Fisher Ames--author of the House language-- contradicted their own decrees. "Respecting" is clearly referring to "articles of faith" that can only be done by a church:
Journal of the House of Representatives of the United States, 1789-1793

FRIDAY, AUGUST 21, 1789
The House resumed the consideration of the amendments made by the Committee of the Whole House to the report from the committee of eleven, to whom it was referred to take the subject of amendments to the Constitution of the United States, generally, into their consideration; and, the said amendments being partly agreed to, and partly disagreed to,
The House proceeded to consider the original report of the committee of eleven, consisting of seventeen articles, as now amended; whereupon the first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, ninth, tenth, eleventh, twelfth, thirteenth, fourteenth, fifteenth, and sixteenth articles being again read and debated, were, upon the question severally put thereupon, agreed to by the House, as follows, two-thirds of the members present concurring, to wit:

3. Congress shall make no law establishing religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof, nor shall the rights of conscience be infringed.
Journal of the Senate of the United States of America, 1789-1793

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1789.
The Senate assembled: present as yesterday.
Proceeded in the consideration of the resolve of the House of Representatives of
the 24th of August, on "Articles to be proposed to the legislatures of the several states as amendments to the constitution of the United States;" and,

On motion to amend article the third, to read as follows: "Congress shall make no law establishing articles of faith or a mode of worship, or prohibiting the free exercise of religion, or abridging the freedom of speech, or the press, or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and petition to the government for the redress of grievances"[bold face mine]

It passed in the affirmative.

Journal of the Senate of the United States of America, 1789-1793

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1789.
The Senate assembled: present as yesterday.
Mr. Ellsworth, on behalf of the managers of the conference, on "Articles to be proposed to the several states as amendments to the constitution of the United States," reported as follows:

That it will be proper for the House of Representatives to agree to the said amendments, proposed by the Senate, with an amendment to their fifth amendment, so that the third article shall read as follows: 'Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble; and petition the government for a redress of grievances;'

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