Monday, September 12, 2011

George Washington's Masonry

Contrary to popular secular belief, 18th Century American Masonry, contradistinguished from the English Lodges, was Trinitarian Christian. 18th century Masonry is a tell-tale into George Washington's faith. Washington took Communion and was Baptized outside of the Anglican Church, not to be identified with the King's religion. What then of Rev. Abercrombie affirming GW never took communion from a U.S. Senator? The context appears to be that of his church. Thus, the secret of GW getting baptized and taking communion outside of his church.

If GW was not a Christian, why would he be a member of a Christian society that promoted the Trinity? Yet, GW wrote, "I shall always be happy to advance the interests of the society." Here is what 18th century Masonry believed:

The British troops evacuated Philadelphia and the campaign of 1778 closed with the contending armies in nearly the same position as they were in the summer of 1776. In the latter part of Decernber, Washington visited Philadelphia, where Congress was in session; and while there the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania celebrated the festival of St. John the Evangelist. Washington was present on the occasion, and was honored with the chief place in the procession, being supported on his right by the Grand Master, and on his left by the Deputy Grand Master. More than three hundred brethren joined in the procession. They met at nine o'clock, at the college, and being properly clothed, the officers in the jewels of their office and other badges of their dignity, the procession moved at eleven o'clock and proceeded to Christ Church where a Masonic sermon for the benefit of the poor was preached by the Rev. Brother William Smith, D.D., Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania.But I will detain you no longer, Brethren !—You all pant to have a Foretaste of the Joy of Angels, by calling forth into immediate Exercise this heavenly Virtue of Charity; whereby you will give Glory to the THRICE BLESSED THREE, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, one God over all! At the Word 'Glory,' the Brethren rose together; and, in reverential Posture, on pronouncing the Names of the TRI-UNE GOD, accompanied the same by a correspondent Repitition of the Ancient Sign or Symbol of Divine Homage and Obeisance; concluding with the following Response— 'Amen I So let it ever be !
Most, if not all the Masons were Orthodox Christians. Why would a unitarian be a member of a Trinitarian society?  Soon after this event, the Masons wanted to make GW head of Masonry. Here is another poem of apparent Orthodox Christian Masonry:
An ode commemorative of Washington's participation in the ceremonies, and the position he occupied, was written a few months afterwards by Colonel John Park, a distinguished member of American Union Lodge, addressed to Colonel Proctor, of Pennsylvania, bearing date, February 7, 1779, in which he says:

See Washington, he leads the train,
'Tis he commands the grateful strain;
Sec, every crafted son obeys,
And to the godlike brother homage pays.

Let fame resound him through the land,
And echo, Tis Out Master Grand!
'Tis he our ancient craft shall sway, Whilst we, with three times three, obey.
The early leaders of North Carolina were Masons. Gov. Samuel Johnston, Signer of the DOI, William Hooper, and Richard Caswell, were all Christians. Hooper's Dad was Reverend of Trinity Church.

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